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Post by kc0vbl on Thu May 27, 2010 1:32 am

Hello all,

Few years ago I started collecting/restoring vintage radios. Went back to work so everything was set aside. Now I am back in it.

I havent put my hands in the guts yet, I mostly enjoyed restoring the wood cabinets. Just as a hobby that I started cause I wanted to. Now I think I would like to take it more seriously.

Questions - in the restorations I have tried to correct veneer problems as best I can by matching type, grain, etc. In my first few attempts (now that I look at them again) I did a pretty good job for never have done it before, but it certainly isnt 'perfect'. How much does this hurt the radios value? Should these repairs be as seamless as possible, or do repairs that can be spotted on closed inspection pose a problem?

For example I repaired a large missing chunk on a Philco 39-6 and it is hardly noticeable when upon first glance of the cabinet but upon a closer look it is quite obvious. Not as good of a match as I could have made. I could include photos if that would help.

Comments and thoughts welcome!

Thanks!
Diana
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Post by kc0vbl on Thu May 27, 2010 1:46 am

Ahhhh - 'nother question.

I have a Crosley 515 that someone put a headphone jack into the cabinet. I refinished/repaired the case except for this. Would it be worth trying to remove this modification? If so, suggestions on how?

Thanks again
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Post by Bill Cahill on Thu May 27, 2010 11:21 am

The jack should be easy to remove. Usually held on with a nut. Disconnect the wiring from it, and, the secondary wires from output transformer simply re connect to speaker voice coil terminals. Remove any extra wiring.
Plugging up the hole may be a little more interesting. Any experts here with some good ideas?
Bill Cahill

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Post by Bill Cahill on Thu May 27, 2010 3:10 pm

kc0vbl wrote:Hello all,

Few years ago I started collecting/restoring vintage radios. Went back to work so everything was set aside. Now I am back in it.

I havent put my hands in the guts yet, I mostly enjoyed restoring the wood cabinets. Just as a hobby that I started cause I wanted to. Now I think I would like to take it more seriously.

Questions - in the restorations I have tried to correct veneer problems as best I can by matching type, grain, etc. In my first few attempts (now that I look at them again) I did a pretty good job for never have done it before, but it certainly isnt 'perfect'. How much does this hurt the radios value? Should these repairs be as seamless as possible, or do repairs that can be spotted on closed inspection pose a problem?

For example I repaired a large missing chunk on a Philco 39-6 and it is hardly noticeable when upon first glance of the cabinet but upon a closer look it is quite obvious. Not as good of a match as I could have made. I could include photos if that would help.

Comments and thoughts welcome!

Thanks!
Diana

In veneer repair, it done properly, it increases it more than leaving chunks out. It may not be worth what a pristine original is worth, but, certainly worth more than leaving the dammage.
Bill Cahill

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New member Empty I'm not a expert with cabinet repairs, but I would try plugging the hole with a wood dowel and then patch the veneer.

Post by Motorola man on Thu May 27, 2010 8:38 pm

Bill Cahill wrote:The jack should be easy to remove. Usually held on with a nut. Disconnect the wiring from it, and, the secondary wires from output transformer simply re connect to speaker voice coil terminals. Remove any extra wiring.
Plugging up the hole may be a little more interesting. Any experts here with some good ideas?
Bill Cahill
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Post by Resistance is Futile on Mon May 31, 2010 12:40 am

Or just use wood putty and match color as close as possible. And blend putty with surrounding wood. Idea
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Post by kb4yrc on Tue Jun 01, 2010 1:04 am

Hi, Diana. Welcome to the spark arker & breaker trippres club........ Gregg

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Post by Gordon on Wed Jun 02, 2010 4:14 am

The hole repair can be done like Motorola said, with a wood dowel. I would match the veener like you have done before and glue it to the end of the dowel. Place the piece in the hole and line up the grain. Mark the dowel and case on the inside with a line. Remove the piece and apply your glue. Ensure the out side is flush by clamping a piece of wood over the hole or some other flat surface.
I personaly try to avoid repairs in veener in geometric shapes by cutting out with the grain slightly larger pieces of veener than the damage. This helps the repair to fit into the grain pattern rather than standing out as a circle or square.
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