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Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it!

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Post by chrisc on Sun Feb 09, 2014 7:48 pm

That's great - thanks for the detailed explanation! I have never yet faced this issue but I think I must be on borrowed time by now !

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Post by Guest on Sun Feb 09, 2014 7:54 pm

I have never yet faced this issue but I think I must be on borrowed time by now !

Same here, I know it will happen at some point!  Crying or Very sad 

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Post by Dr. Radio on Thu Feb 13, 2014 9:09 pm

Now to lay the groundwork for rebuilding...using much more reliable modern components.

Fortunately, 110pF capacitors in the "dipped" silver mica variety are still available. These compact, epoxy covered units are 110pF, rated at 500 volts with a tolerance of +/- 5%.  These will do nicely and should, with a little luck, hopefully last another 50 years... Razz 

It's just a matter of planning the "install".  Again, other restorers tend to simply reassemble the "can" without the capacitors, then when the "can" is reinstalled in the radio's chassis, the capacitors are just "hung" (soldered) on the pins of the IF transformer which also connect to the external circuitry, whether it is point-to-point wiring, or printed circuit boards.  To give it a clean look and conserve space, we'll be installing these inside just like the originals. Obviously, the "real estate" these take-up is more than the factory mica wafer, so a little forethought will have to go into this....

Here's what we have to work with it:

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto106_zpsfbba4c33

You'll see the pile of removed pieces in the corner. The contact tabs were completely removed to make extra space, and besides, they won't do us any good as we will not be reusing the mica sheet at all. The top "cover" that provided protection and mechanical pressure on the original sheet and tabs will also be discarded. To remove the contact tabs, you must be careful not to damage the "legs" portion of the assembly. Depending on the design of the transformer, you may need different tools for the removal process.  

On this unit, I first tried to "nip" the tabs a little past where they angle off from the legs (this way there is still some anchoring with a small portion of the tab left remaining) with my miniature side cutters. No go! The material was too thick to make a quick "bite" and I didn't want to damage my cutters or the plastic base. I quickly discovered I was making it harder then I had to. What I did was take my miniature needle nose pliers, really clamped down and gave 'em a good twist. Snapped right off leaving just a bit left--just the ticket!

Now, with this base's design, the legs won't pull out away from the base, even with our modifications, BUT now they will easily push in since we don't have the tabs being sandwiched under that top plate. We need to take steps to ensure the legs can't be pushed in, which could easily damage all of our hard work that took place inside once we're done. Time to secure everything in place!
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Post by Dr. Radio on Thu Feb 13, 2014 9:29 pm

The first step is to prepare the base for epoxy. The epoxy will be used to secure the small portion left of each tab to the plastic assembly.  This way, they (the legs) won't push in or pull out accidentally causing damage.

To prepare the base for epoxy means giving the epoxy something it can really "bite" into. The smooth surface of the plastic base won't do a very good job of this, so we need to "roughen" the surface up with either a pick or small blade.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto107_zps0ee59eaa

I've had good luck with two-part epoxy JB WELD. Even though the fully cured product supposedly has good insulation qualities, just as a precaution, I made sure I didn't "short" any two pins with weld being "dripped" across".

It's just a matter of getting enough epoxy to cover the small area and ensure a good grip, but not getting so much put in that it starts eating up the space that will be needed for the new capacitors.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto108_zps5ffb59dc

...Just a matter of letting the epoxy dry undisturbed, but in the same token, making sure the legs are completely protruding properly out of the bottom of the base so we can solder it back to the printed circuit board successfully when the time comes....
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Post by Dr. Radio on Thu Feb 13, 2014 10:38 pm

Well, while that epoxy dries,  Cool  let's take a little side-step and look at how some other IF transformers are constructed compared with the ones in our project. (I'm going somewhere with this, trust me Razz )....


The Automatic Manufacturing Corporation's style of "cans" can be found in many, many, many radios. They are also quite notorious for the silver mica capacitor problems. Arguably, the GE style we have may still be considered more problematic.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto109_zpsf26b0bad


Other then the mounting arrangements, the outside doesn't look too terribly different, however, inside the can is an entirely different layout in construction!

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto110_zps1eec76b8

The compression placed on the "sandwich" of connection tabs and mica capacitor sheet in the base is provided by a plastic piece, a rivet and retainer assembly.  This model has larger "slugs" at actually cover the coils as they adjust up and down.


Here's another style you may come across. This Ratel (Radio Television Products) IF transformer uses actual threaded rods connected to the "slugs" to allow them to raise and lower inside the coil assembly.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto111_zps461c9b82


This by far, would be about the easiest "can" to rebuild as the wafer is easily accessible and there is no cover--the tabs were pressed down firmly enough to hold the capacitor in place and provide the electrical connections.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto112_zpsd092f637

Despite the "exposed" capacitor design in this style, I personally have not encountered a lot of issues with these. I'd like to hear from others what their experiences are with these Ratel "cans".


****************************************





It's always good to compare and contrast, but the real point I was trying to make with this-- is the reason why General Electric radios from the 1950s and 1960s were/are so well known (even when they were only a few years old--much to the dismay of lots of repair shop technicians) for IF transformer issues thanks to their in-house design.

The GE design was meant be quick and inexpensive. Certainly what a large corporation wants when producing millions of consumer-grade receivers.  It's been my experience that no one has really touched on why the failure rate was/is so high for these units--specifically.

I'll sum it up.

Instead of providing a "solid" means of compressing the contacts against the mica wafer's silver substrate (such as a riveted piece of plastic), GE simply used melted plastic tabs to hold a "cover" in place. No matter how tightly the assembly may have been initially "squished", the melted plastic provided meager tension and allowed a lot more "give" due to its nature then a mechanical means. Take our example of instance, some of the melted plastic tabs actually "popped off" not long after initial assembly!

Another item worthy of mentioning is the connection tabs themselves. They appear to be very crudely produced--no apparent "tinning" or coating or plating. I'm not sure what the composition of the metal is, but it is rather 'dark' in its apparent raw form which contacts the capacitor silvering. Anything that didn't have much protection from oxidation in the beginning will only increase the speed and frequency of connection issues.

Now that we've seen what these are all about, it's just a matter of using modern technology to our advantage to retrofit these troublemakers so they aren't so troublesome going forward.   Surprised 

Stay tuned....
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Post by Dr. Radio on Wed Feb 19, 2014 8:49 pm

Moving right along....time for the rebuilding....            cheers       

An absolute must is a good pair of miniature needle nose pliers.  Tweezers will also come in handy in a little bit...

The pliers are used to make bends in the leads of the new replacement mica capacitors.  The original base's connections are used as a reference in spacing.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto113_zps3faee0d4

After some rough measurements, the lengths and angles can further be tweaked as needed.  The capacitors aren't installed just yet though...

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto114_zps0b304f6a


The next step is to prepare the base's original connections to accept our modifications.  The pliers are used to bend the tips of the connections into partial hooks to make it easier to wrap the leads of the capacitors around for a solid mechanical connection.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto115_zps025686a1


Adjustments are made so the original and new parts are bent inward, away from the outside perimeter of the base. Keeping conductive paths away from the outside will ensure there will be no shorts to the inside of the can.



Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto116_zps4b685f2a

Luckily with the design of this transformer, the coil form allows for plenty of "height"--the capacitors have room be mounted as shown without interfering with the bottom of the bottom-most coil form.  Speaking of coil form assembly--we better make sure the capacitors don't block the hole in which the coil's tube mounts in!
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Post by Dr. Radio on Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:09 pm

After final adjustments are made so the capacitor fits in the available space as well as it can, and the leads are mechanically sound, it's time to solder for a good electrical connection.  The excess leads are not cut off. These will be used later--they are simply left sticking straight out of the solder connection.  Before finalizing--it is important to verify the capacitors are put "across" the proper base connections!  We've come to far to goof-up now!

I used my adjustable heat "pencil" style soldering iron for this type of small, fragile work. A large "gun" style soldering iron is not what you would want to use!

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto117_zps88872221

A good solid (both mechanical and electrical) solder joint is very important at these points. The last thing we want is something that breaks loose or goes intermittent after we button everything up!

After both legs of the new capacitor are soldered to the factory connections, the process is repeated for the other side.


Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto118_zps4b0e8938

After all connections are tight and then soldered, it's important to scrutinize the connections for good solder flow.  Again, the last thing we want is an issue with our "new" work since as you've probably figured out by now--this isn't the most fun process in the world. Crying or Very sad
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Post by Dr. Radio on Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:17 pm

The next step is preparing a way for us to reconnect the very fine wires that link the coil to the base connections.  You'll remember some length was "lost" during the removal process in order to prevent potential damage to the fragile coils.  No need to worry, the extra length in connection leads will now come into play.

This is why the excess was not simply clipped off--it is now used with the help of the needle nose pliers to form small loops. I guess you can think of each one as the "eye" of a needle....I think you can see where I am going with this...... Laughing 


Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto119_zpsfb74d967

Once each loop is successfully formed, then any excess length can be clipped off.  Again, keep all connections away from the outside perimeter of the base.


Time to get that coil form out of its hiding place. Thanks to careful storage, no damage to it was sustained while other work was done to this radio project. cheers 

All the marks previously made will now come into play.  It's just a matter of aligning all the pieces to return the assembly back to the factory original set-up.

The coil form's mark will be aligned with the mark on the bottom of the base assembly.  With this transformer design, the tube simply slips back into the hole in the base with its notches corresponding with the small guides inside the base's hole.


Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto120_zps7ad7ee6a


Once the coil form is seated back into the base assembly, it is time to review the notes taken on which wire goes where!  After carefully verifying connections, it is time to "thread the needle" four times!

Taking your time is key!  The leads from the coils are very fragile.  Tweezers are very helpful!  With a little finesse, each coil lead is placed in the middle of each loop (a slight bend in the end of the fine wire helps keep it from slipping out).  One connection is made at a time.  Carefully soldering the "loop"  closed provides a good electrical and mechanical connection to the fine laminated wire.  Laminated?  Yes, the coil wiring is coated so it does not short out when wrapped in many, many turns around the assembly.  The red color is actually the coating.  Normally you would want to mechanically scrape or clean this off, but due to the fact this wire is very fine, it's not really practical. The heat of the molten solder actually "boils" off this coating so the bare wire underneath gets an electrical connection. We'll verify this in a little bit.

Here's what the final product looks like:

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto121_zps72e658b1


Again, all connections are carefully scrutinized to ensure their reliability before proceeding.

So was the surgery successful? Shocked 

The first thing to verify is the resistance measurements. We want to see what was previously measured in this rebuild thread.  A quick check with the ohm meter connected to the base pins shows each coil has a resistance of approximately 21 ohms. Just what we want to see!  This verifies the coil connections to the base assembly are electrically sound.

The capacitor connections were previously scrutinized (visually). We can't just measure the capacitance now because the coils across each capacitor would prevent a correct measurement (it would look like a short).  There are ways to verify this assembly is functioning using a signal generator and oscilloscope, but for the sake of time and simplicity, we'll just risk reassembly as-is.  Shocked  You'll just have to trust my rebuilding skills.  Very Happy 

Again, those marks that were made sure come in handy! The base's relationship to the housing (can) is quickly identified.  Just a matter of aligning marks for proper reassembly.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto122_zpseace5f10

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Post by Dr. Radio on Wed Feb 19, 2014 10:49 pm

But wait!

Before the reassembly, remember what was previously mentioned about the base?  The key was to make sure all connections are "inward" so nothing sticks out past the extreme edge of the base where it could short out to the can OR get damaged when the can is slipped back over the transformer internals.

A straightedge is quite helpful. I simply used the dull side of a razor blade butted up against the base at different positions to ensure that no connections are outside the "safety" of the base's perimeter.  Some manufacturers used various insulation inside the can to prevent shorts, but this can actually end up wasting precious space or breaking loose at a later time.  It's sometimes just best to double-check your work. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure as they say.  silent 


Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto123_zps25a9ccb4

Since the internals were rebuilt with care, it is now just a matter of sliding the can back over the assembly [carefully] while making sure the marks all line up.  With this design, the coil assembly tube fits into the top area of the can to hold it centered and prevent the base and coil form from pushing too far inside the can. With it reassembled, it's time to make sure it stays that way.  The first step is simply just using finger pressure to squeeze the can back around the base.

Here's a little trick to get the crimps back in place to truly hold it all together properly....

Push pins!

A light press on each of the original points recreates the pressure needed to get the "bite" back.


Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto124_zps6fd04a7c


The very last double-check before considering the rebuild complete is a resistance check. Again, using the ohm meter, a quick check between the housing and each pin will let us know if there are any issues. You want to see infinite resistance (an open) between the can and each base connection. Any resistance means there is something rubbing against the inside of the can--not good!

The resistance checks came out a-ok.   Very Happy 

Now it's just a matter of reinstalling the IF transformer back onto the printed circuit board. Again, Laughing the alignment of the marks ensure proper orientation.


Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto126_zpsbb5d71e3



Guess what?  One down, one to go....... Shocked


....stay tuned.....
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Post by Dr. Radio on Fri Feb 21, 2014 7:07 pm

As an aside, I thought this was neat. Doing some searching on the web revealed the original patent application information for the IF transformer design made [in]famous by General Electric....

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 GeIFpatent_zpsfb702201
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Post by Dr. Radio on Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:06 pm

Well, the 2nd rebuild went a-ok.  Very Happy 

Rather then show all the steps again, I can assure you, the process was the same. Rebuild-repeat.  Razz This model uses the same value capacitance in both "cans".

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto127_zps20730cd5

The other can's "insides" revealed the truth. This was the one definitely responsible for the very faint beginnings of a "Thunderstorm on a Sunny Day". You can clearly see how the migration progressed much more and began to "link" the two capacitor forms.

Step by Step Restoration: GE T-106C, Let's go for it! - Page 5 Geresto128_zps4716a4dd

 Evil or Very Mad 

Time to breathe a sigh of relief now that both IF transformers have been rebuilt! One less thing to worry about.  Embarassed 


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Post by Dr. Radio on Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:29 pm

We're about ready for the alignment process to get this radio working at it's best, and to re-visit our cabinet restoration to really make it look like it just left the assembly line again.

But.... a wrench in the works.  Early on I noticed the volume control was a scratchy. Nothing out of the ordinary there, especially considering all the dust and grime that was cleared out of the cabinet. I did also notice that near the very "end" of travel (volume turned way down), there would be split second when you'd hear a hum in the speaker (like an amp feedback). My hope was there was a piece of grime on the resistance track inside the pot and the wiper was actually riding over and physically losing connection with the resistance.

I sprayed some electronic cleaner inside the volume pot.  No more scratchy/dirty control. However, now when turned to minimum volume, there appears to be too much volume from the speakers. In other words, you can't turn the volume down as far as you should be able to....

 Embarassed 

Decision time. Leave as-is?  Try to find a replacement?  

At this point I'm reasonably sure this is a physical fault within the volume pot and not with the related circuitry. I'm going to double check some things.

If it is truly the pot at fault and the only downside is the fact it is "a bit too loud at minimum volume".............

What do you guys think???


A) Leave it as-is ("live with it")

B)Try to track down the necessary parts to make it work properly.


???
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Post by Guest on Thu Mar 06, 2014 9:36 pm

I would leave the pot as is and get to the alignment. When it's finished, and if i really like it I might go back to the pot.

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Post by Bill Cahill on Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:25 pm

Leave as is.

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Post by neali on Thu Oct 02, 2014 10:51 am

Wow. Great write up on SMD repair. I can't believe it stopped on the volume pot cliff hanger. So, what was the ultimate fate of this AA5? I would have replaced the volume pot. Mark Oppat can get you any volume pot that you need.

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Post by Bill Cahill on Thu Oct 02, 2014 7:34 pm

And, that wouldn't have fixed your problem.

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Post by Dr. Radio on Wed Oct 08, 2014 2:58 pm

Actually Bill.......


All I can say is please be patient. "Stay Tuned" Smile

I have not given up on the radio, so please don't give up on the follow along. Some more pressing matters have once again reared their ugly head. I won't leave this one in a cliff hanger!

There are some interesting tales to post again!
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Post by Bill Cahill on Thu Oct 09, 2014 8:33 am

Hey, I LOVE cliff hangers, as long as they get finished. I thrive on projects......

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Post by neali on Sat Oct 11, 2014 3:46 am

Bill Cahill wrote:And, that wouldn't have fixed your problem.

ok, Sensei,

I have had this problem in two radios and both have been cured by a new volume pot. So what, in your vast vast experience, is another potential cure?

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Post by neali on Wed Oct 15, 2014 1:30 pm

Well that was a little snarky.

Sorry Bill, let me rephrase that.

What other causes have you seen result in the volume doesn't go low enough problem.

And good luck on your surgery.

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Post by Bill Cahill on Wed Oct 15, 2014 3:58 pm

Sorry. Not trying to be nasty. I have seen leaky caps, off value resistors, a lot of stuff. You never know. I can be completely wrong, and, it might be the volume control.

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