Home made power supply

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Home made power supply

Post by Nick666 on Wed Dec 08, 2010 2:35 pm

I am planning on building a power supply to run one of my battery radios and i need advise on how to do this.It will need to be able to supply the following voltages.A)2V B+)135,67,45 C-)-9.I plan on using a 80 globe as the rect.tube as the radio is from 1927.Please let me know if this is even possable as well as any ideas on how to build it.

Nick
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Re: Home made power supply

Post by Resistance is Futile on Wed Dec 08, 2010 5:26 pm

Wink Here's a very good tutorial on power supplies for farm and portable tube radios.
Click Here--> Battery supply

At least this will point you in the right direction. If your going to use a #80 tube you will need to find a schematic that will have those exact voltages, then build one from the schematic.


Last edited by Resistance is Futile on Wed Dec 08, 2010 10:02 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Home made power supply

Post by Bill Cahill on Wed Dec 08, 2010 9:56 pm

An 80 will not be able to handle the filament current.
BH could.
They made seperate supplies because alot of radios have uncompatible hook ups. A+is often where B- is. Etc.
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Re: Home made power supply

Post by Nick666 on Thu Dec 09, 2010 2:26 pm

I guess that i should give you guys some more info about the radio.The radio is a Canadian Westinghouse 16.Here is a link to some pics. of one that someone posted in the ARF photo gallery.
www.antiqueradios.com/gallery/v/westinghouse_canada/
Please note that this is not my radio.The radio in the pics. uses 6x 201-B tubes and mine uses 6x 30 tubes.The 6 wires in the battery cable on mine are labled as follows:1)A+ 2)B+135v 3)B+67v 4)B+45v 5)C-9v 6)A-B-&C+
I had been planing on running the tube filaments off a power transformer with a 2.5v filament winding and using a dropping resistor to lower the voltage to 2v.I hope this is helpful.

Here is a copy of the schematic that i have for this radio.



Nick


Last edited by Nick666 on Mon Dec 13, 2010 7:24 pm; edited 5 times in total
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Re: Home made power supply

Post by Bill Cahill on Thu Dec 09, 2010 4:26 pm

I doubt that is enough, plus, you must have dc voltage on the filaments. AC will cause a loud hum.
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Re: Home made power supply

Post by Nick666 on Thu Dec 09, 2010 6:09 pm

sorry,i can't seem to get the pic. to display.Bill i don't understand.Please elaborate on what is not enough.

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Re: Home made power supply

Post by Bill Cahill on Fri Dec 10, 2010 12:26 am

First, the amperage, unless the filament winding is good for at least 6 amps.
And, as I said, it must be dc, or, you will get ac hum through the filament supply.
I also see that you will have to make a seperate C supply.
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Re: Home made power supply

Post by Nick666 on Fri Dec 10, 2010 3:29 am

I guess that i'm going to have to think this idea out a little better.

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Re: Home made power supply

Post by failafraid on Tue Dec 13, 2011 8:48 am

Homemade Bench peak Power provide
Iíve habitually had an interest for electronics and lately Iíve been discovering my concerns more. Last week I arranged through my tub of components and placed them in individual sketches. It took a good while to sort everything but I believe it was worth it. Iíve glimpsed power provision constructed from PC power provision before so I thought Iíd build one my self. Thing is, I never actually got round to it.

Yesterday I was feeling rather determined and decided to make a bench top power supply for little electronics. All the sites I discovered I have lost, so I kind of made it up as I went along. Most of them utilised ATX power provision that are gladly available, but I opted for the easy way out and used an AT with a hard on/off switch. At first this was the only cause I utilised it, but there are more benefits to utilising a AT over an ATX power provide for an external power provide. Firstly, it was bargain, well free really. I took it from a PC that I had changed some time ago. I have a carton full of AT power provision in storage that Iíll get to some time and restore it. But I wonít be utilising the PC it came out of for a while, mostly because I have toaster ovens that are faster. Another cause it is better than a ATX is it has less voltages. The only voltages recorded are 12v, 5v, -5v (7v) and GND. They alter in amps but are adequate for what I will be utilising it for. It made it very simple not to attach it up since there wasnít many wires.

To make it was really easy. I took the peak off. Drilled 4 apertures in the case and injected the insulated fatal, ascertaining to make sure they didnít ground out on the case. Cut most of the cables, departing a twosome of molexís hanging out just in case I need them. I then soldered the remaining wires to a fatal by voltage (Yellow +12, Red +5, Red +/-5, Black GND.) It might not be the prettiest of them all, but I believe it will do its job well.
washing machines

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Re: Home made power supply

Post by NashvilleRad on Tue Jan 24, 2012 8:20 am

Here's a power supply I'm about to put together:



It's a 120 to 12.6 VAC transformer I got out of a broken computer speaker system (from Goodwill for $1.00), and a Velleman 1A power supply, with $1.00 plastic junction box from Home Depot and a few pieces of hardware from Radio Shack (now known at 'The Shack' for whatever reason).

The output on the Velleman board can be adjusted bewtween 0 to 23 VDC depending on the transformer/supply - I'm trying to find a small extension type rod to poke through the enclosure and mount to the trimmer pot so I can adjust to voltage - I haven't looked for a 4700 Ohm potentiometer (if there is one) to use in place of the trimmer (per Velleman instructions). I guess I could always put the trimmer outside the enclosure.

It's amazing what you can find at Goodwill.

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Re: Home made power supply

Post by Resistance is Futile on Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:16 pm

Failafraid:

" I am not familiar with the term you used in your comments, "Fatal" as in "... insulated fatal... " and "...I then soldered the remaining wires to a fatal by voltage..." .

Could you explain that, ground? power?insulated wire? Voltage?
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Re: Home made power supply

Post by willy3486 on Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:15 am

A lm 317 voltage regulator makes a decent power supply. I have made a few using it and run it through some caps/resistor to filter it.

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Building a tube radio power supply

Post by dan88king on Fri Oct 18, 2013 12:11 pm

Hello, I have had some experience with building this type of power supply. I followed the same general circuit that Antique Electronic Supply uses for their battery radio power supply kit. For the low voltage DC filament voltage of 2 volts, I would use a 6.3 volt or 12.6 volt filament transformer, a full-wave rectifier bridge from Radio shack, adequate voltage and capacity rated electrolytic capacitor, a bleeder resistor across the raw DC output, and an LM317 adjustable voltage regulator IC. I think its output current rating is 1 1/2 amps. The circuit diagram is on the back of the Radio Shack package. I used a potentiometer to find the correct resistance for 2.0 volts output from the regulator, and then soldered in the same value in a fixed resistor.
For the various B-plus voltages, I have had good stable results using a series string of 11-volt and 22-volt zener diodes. This divides the raw DC voltage from the solid-state or vacuum tube rectifier (again using a bleeder resistor) and filter capacitors down in steps, and by choosing other Zener diode voltages, you can obtain the minus 9 volts bias voltage, by connecting the B-minus output wire one or two steps up from the minus end of the diode string. I got 135 volts, 90 volts, 67 volts, 45 volts, and 22 volts. I think there is a current-limiting resistor involved somewhere in the circuit, so the zener string desn't draw excessive current.
This also works with very low DC voltages, and I built a power supply for servicing transistor radios, that has all the reqired voltages, from 1 1/2 volts up to 12 volts. The raw DC rectified and filtered voltage was stabilized by an LM317 IC, then divided down in 1 1/2 volt steps and fed to a row of Fahnestock clips.
I hope this is useful. Good Luck!

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