Radios To Try

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Radios To Try

Post by Guest on Fri Dec 28, 2012 11:08 pm

It's been suggested, I thought I would open up the topic. I found the RCA 75X11 to be a relatively easy radio to restore and has worked out to be a decent performer. The base model also has a cabinet and hardware that looks nice when cleaned and shined. One caution, try to start with as good an acrylic dial glass as possible.

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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Guest on Fri Dec 28, 2012 11:14 pm

Here is some info on the RCA 75X11;

http://antiqueradio.org/rca06.htm

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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Wildcat445 on Sat Dec 29, 2012 1:48 pm

I have two of these radios. They are good performers for AA5 radios. They can be challenging to get the chassis out of the cabinet, due to the arrangement of the dial pointer and its relationship to the cabinet. The acrylic dial cover can be cleaned nicely with Simichrome or Novus. The dial markings are stamped into the dial cover and can be repainted and then the dial polished. The brass trim around the front tends to tarnish rather badly. I polished mine with a buffing wheel, then applied a gloss clear coat. That prevents the trim from turning dark again. The chassis is fairly straigforward with the usual RCA design quirks. "Lead dress" is important to prevent hum and/or oscillation. On both of mine, the antenna loops were open. That was somewhat of a mystery, as they are well-supported and are not subject to injury due to their placement in the cabinet. I was fortunate to have been able to find the breaks with the aid of lots of light and a magnifying glass. My wife has kidnapped both of mine and have proclaimed them to be "hers." I guess they must be "cute."

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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Wildcat445 on Sat Dec 29, 2012 2:28 pm

The little cheap GE clock radios with printed circuit boards are easy to restore. There are practically no parts to go bad. Madman Muntz must have worked for GE when these things were built. Bad filter caps and faulty tube socket connections are about the only thing that can go wrong. The circuit boards can be broken if the cabinet has been damaged, so that would be a caveat there. Most of the plastic cabinets are "cute" if that is a concern and the clocks are dependable. The knobs are generic if one is missing and the volume knob is generic GE. You can buy a bushel basket full for nearly nothing, as the purist "collectors" turn their noses up at them. It is a good, cheap, uncomplicated place to start.

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WC

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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Guest on Sat Dec 29, 2012 4:44 pm

There is also a market for them. Many people today are into "retro-renovation" and are looking for colorful 1960's plastic radios to complete their retro-rooms.

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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Wildcat445 on Sat Dec 29, 2012 5:01 pm

Admiral made some little 4-tubers in the early 1960's that had colorful and interesting plastic cabinets. They used printed circuit chassis and work surprisingly well, for just 4 tubes. They were untra-cheap when they were new and nobody wants them now. I pick up every plastic cheap little radio I can find. My wife likes the fact that they are colorful.

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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Guest on Sat Dec 29, 2012 5:10 pm

and nobody wants them now

Keep getting them, I believe that will change!

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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Dr. Radio on Sat Dec 29, 2012 8:44 pm

If I can remember (and locate the exact model number) I have a Airline from the early 1950s with, well, "a face only a mother could love" Razz ...kinda boring and simple, but for a stamped steel chassis and 5 miniature tubes, there is a TON of room under the chassis to do work. That would be a good noobie radio for those still trying to hone their soldering skills and component replacement work.
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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Brig on Mon Feb 18, 2013 6:37 pm

A unit I would suggest as one to try and one that I found easy to restore is the RCA 56X5 (mfd. 1946). It's a six-tube AC/DC and has two bands, "Foreign" and "United States." Interestingly, it has spread bands for the crowded 31-meter and 25-meter bands. It's an attractive table model and performs remarkably well.

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Re: Radios To Try

Post by Guest on Mon Feb 18, 2013 7:42 pm

That is a good looking unit. It was a strong contender, but bid sniping diverted me to an RCA 8R71 AM/FM.

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