Restoration Strategies ...

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Restoration Strategies ...

Post by cwmoser on Tue Aug 07, 2012 8:58 am

How about a discussion on the best strategies to restore a vintage TV?

EVALUATION:
The first thing I do is to make sure the TV is complete and nothing is burned up
like the Flyback.
Then I test the CRT if my CRT tester can test it, and see if it is good or not.


ELECTRONICS:
I've seen You Tube videos of guys powering up vintage TVs with a Variac, Watt Meter,
and Thermometer - but I don't do it that way.

Mostly what I have restored are 60+ years old TVs and I go ahead and perform a
total 100% recap of all Paper Capacitors and Electrolytic Capacitors before
I apply power. I am pretty methodical and mark or make note where components go
and make very few substitution mistakes - but I have made mistakes that are most
times quickly resolved later after powering up. Most times the TV does not come alive even
after doing this and then I need find other component failures and/or make some tuning
tweaks. My philosophy is that these old TVs need to have these capacitors replaced - so
why not just do a wholesale replacement in one step of the process.

In addition, I don't like to stuff waxy paper capacitors with new -- I think the new looks better.
I do like the look of stuffed Electrolytic Can Capacitors but I don't do this as a rule because
I don't like spending the time opening a can and stuffing capacitors in there. But, I think
it is a better restoration to stuff Electrolytic Cans.

In addition to recapping, before I power up, all the tubes are checked and all the Controls and
tube sockets are cleaned with Deoxit contact cleaner. Sometimes I will check the Resistors but
most times I just do a spot check.

One more thing I always do before powering up is to dress up the chassis. Most times I don't go
overboard but I do clean off the Rust, clean the chassis of dirt and filth, paint the Power Transformer shells,
and paint the Flyback cage if it looks bad.

After doing all this work, then I will power up and debug.


CABINET:
I have no hard rule about the Cabinet - I might restore it before, during or after the Electronic
restoration - my objective is that the TV is going to work when I am done whether sooner or later.
I try to preserve the Speaker Grill Cloth but originality is not a rule. I don't have a problem going
to the cloth shop and finding something either close in appearance to the original or something
complementary. I love old TVs that have solid brass parts and will strip the part, polish, and then
spray lacquer to protect it. I have not totally stripped a wood cabinet - not good enough to do that.
I do prefer the "patina" of the old finish.

SUMMARY:
Overall, I think I can recap with a high degree of accuracy but quite lacking with Signal Trace Debugging.
I need to spend more time learning this skill.
Cabinet restoration is also a skill I need to learn and spend more time on.

Carl

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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by Bill Cahill on Tue Aug 07, 2012 6:01 pm

Stick around. I can help you on both.
I've seen your cabinet work, though, it's not a bad start.
You need a little more color, and, a couple minor points, but, Not hard for you. I also believe in nice, shiny brass, and, coat it with clear lacquer.
I polish knobs, etc...
I like my tubes clean, my chassis lightly shiny, and, neatly done. Like the top to look as it did when new. I see for the most part you do aslo.
You do a fine job. I'm happy to help with tips.
Please keep coming back.
Bill Cahill

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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by cwmoser on Tue Aug 07, 2012 8:03 pm

I had one particularly nasty chassis that I took outside,
Sprayed it all over with Spray 9 and then hosed it off.
Course I put plastic bags over the parts that would be
damaged if wet. I've only done this once though.
Turned out well - my GE 805 TV.

Carl

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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by Bill Cahill on Fri Aug 10, 2012 8:58 pm

I have one chassis that I gave up on that looks like it was taken outside, and, left there.
Bad flyback, leaky power transformer that gives large shocks, and, draws alot of current, etc... Was just too far gone.

Bill Cahill

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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by N7ZAL on Mon Dec 31, 2012 9:44 pm

Very good tips. One thing I do with just about every type of repair is to take pictures with a digital camera. Really helps when things have to be put back together.
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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by cwmoser on Fri Jan 11, 2013 8:17 am

N7ZAL wrote:Very good tips. One thing I do with just about every type of repair is to take pictures with a digital camera. Really helps when things have to be put back together.

Ditto. I take lots of before, during, and after photos.
And, I store them on my PC for review in folders with the date
and a description of the progress. Like you mentioned,
the photos I take are very useful in the restoration process.

Here is an example how do mine:
http://www.cerant.com/TV%20Philco%2048-2500%20Projection%20-%201948/00%20RESTORATION%20PROCESS/

Carl

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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by Ken g on Fri Jan 11, 2013 9:22 pm

What are the pictures for ? before & after showings ?

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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by Bill Cahill on Fri Jan 11, 2013 10:03 pm

Before, during, and, after. But, the videos are not working, though.
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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by cwmoser on Sat Jan 12, 2013 9:17 am

I referred back to those pictures during the restoration to show
me how the CRT was mounted, how to reassemble the optics,
when during recapping I lost where a capacitor goes, etc. They
were very helpful.

Bill, those videos are MP4 format. Might be either you do not
have a player for MP4 or that they need to be downloaded and
then played.

Carl

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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by Bill Cahill on Sat Jan 12, 2013 10:56 am

I have Real Player, and, Windows Media Player.
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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by cwmoser on Sat Jan 12, 2013 12:20 pm

Code be that you need an MP4 Codec for your PC.

Will your players play this test file:
http://archive.org/details/Pbtestfilemp4videotestmp4

Carl

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Re: Restoration Strategies ...

Post by Bill Cahill on Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:37 pm

That test file played perfectly. Short, but, played instantly.
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